Texas’ Wildlife Tax Valuation

Are there minimum acreage requirements for the wildlife tax valuation?

The answer to this question is both a yes and a no. Properties that have an ag tax exemption but have been reduced in acreage since the previous tax year must meet minimum acreage requirements, which varies by the appraisal ecorgion in which the land is located. For all other properties that currently have an agricultural valuation, there are no minimum acreage requirements when it comes to switching to wildlife management use. Also, tracts of land that are adjacent to one another, including those separated by road, river, etc., and under the same ownership qualify as one tract of land.

Can I manage for non-game species and qualify for the wildlife tax valuation?

Texas landowners can qualify for the wildlife tax valuation by managing for either game and/or non-game wildlife species. In fact, tracts of land under 100 acres in size offer great opportunities to manage for songbirds, rabbits, squirrels and even reptiles! Brush piles, supplemental shelter, supplemental food, supplemental water and even predator control are all great practices that can make a noticeable difference small acreage properties.

If I have a wildlife tax valuation can I ever switch back to traditional ag?

Yes, you can. Since Texas properties that have a wildlife management tax valuation are still considered agriculture lands, landowners can always return to agricultural practices from wildlife management simply by filing a new 1-d-1 Open Space Appraisal Application with the county appraisal district between January 1 and May 1 of the year they intend to revert back to traditional ag.

How do I apply for a wildlife management tax valuation?

To apply for property tax appraisal of open spaced lands as authorized by Section 1-D-1 of the Texas Constitution, including appraisal of agricultural lands, timber lands, or land used for wildlife management, Texas landowners must submit a 1-D-1 Open Space Appraisal Application from the county appraisal district. Only properties that are currently appraised as agricultural lands or timber lands may convert to appraisal based on wildlife management use.

Landowners wishing to apply for wildlife management appraisal must include with their application a detailed wildlife management plan that specifically outlines the qualifying practices they will implement on their property and the species management efforts will target. By law, all applications must be submitted to the appraisal district before May 1 for the tax year in which the conversion takes place.